Friday, 8 November 2013

#35 Fashion and design Lehenga vs Saree

Lehenga vs Saree                                                                    

Lehenga and Saree are two traditional women’s clothing items from India. These are timeless apparels that have been adorned by commoners and celebrities alike. Saree is more common than Lehenga that is worn on more on special occasions these days. There are many differences between these two garments but people become confused because of the similar looks created by a fusion style known as Lehenga Saree. This article takes a closer look at both these garments to highlight their differences. 

 Image result for lehenga photo

 

  Image result for designer saree photo                          

   Image result for designer saree photo      

     Image result for designer saree photo  
                                        
Saree
                                                                                                                                                  
Saree is an unstitched piece of cloth that is draped around the body of a woman in style. Also called Sari, this traditional garment is worn in many different styles by women to create different effects. Normally Saree is draped around the waist with one end remaining free that is taken across and over the shoulders of the woman. Sarees cover the lower portion of the body and women wear a blouse or a choli to cover their upper parts. This means that the midriff of the woman is bare, making Saree look very stylish and popular even today. Saree is a traditional costume that is worn by women all over the subcontinent of India. Saree is a garment that is available in many different fabrics such as cotton, polyester, silk, chiffon, georgette, and so on. Saree is a graceful dress that mesmerizes westerners even today. They marvel at the costume that covers the entire body and yet is sensuous as it displays the curves of the woman wearing it at just the right areas.

Image result for designer saree photo

Image result for designer saree photo












































Lehenga                                                                                                                   

 Lehenga is a traditional dress of India that has been worn by girls and women since ancient times. In many parts of India, it is also called Ghagra Choli. In fact, Lehenga is an outfit that is made up of a lower part called Lehenga and the upper part called choli or bodice. There is also a third part of the complete outfit that is called dupatta. Lehenga can be worn by small girls and also by elderly women. It is available in many different varieties with ordinary ones made of cotton without having any embellishment, whereas Lehengas can be very expensive also with superior cloth and adornment done with ornaments.



Image result for lehenga photo

Image result for lehenga photo

Image result for lehenga photo


Image result for gujarati style saree and lehenga photo





What is the difference between Lehenga and Saree?

           


 Saree is unstitched cloth draped around the waist, whereas Lehenga is an outfit that is stitched and consists of the lower part called Lehenga and an upper part called choli.
• Lehenga is worn in some parts of the country whereas Saree is common all over India.
• Saree is draped around the waist over a petticoat, and the midriff remains bare.
• Lehenga is worn by brides also making it a special dress for women that is seen on special occasions.
• Lehengas and sarees can be very expensive depending upon the fabric used and the embellishment done on it using beads, Kundan, and small mirrors.
• There is a recent creation called Lehenga Saree that fuses the two garments together confusing people.

Image result for gujarati style saree and lehenga photo


       






































Image result for gujarati style saree and lehenga photo


Image result for gujarati style saree and lehenga photo



 Lehenga style Saree is a new trend of Saree introduced in INDIA.This is an aesthetic blend of the traditional saree and a Lehenga choli. Lehenga style saree is normally 4.5 meters to 5.5 meters long.Stitched as a long flared skirt with a zip at the side, it is made to the measurements of the wearer. The ensemble needs to be slipped in, fasten the zipper and drape the pallu over the shoulders. This is an outfit for ladies who are not comfortable with usual drapping and pleating that the regular saree demands. This style of saree’s pallu has the dramatic effect of the matching dupatta of the conventional Lehenga Choli.Various types of Embroidery patterns are employed according to the Lehenga Style saree. Bagh, Chikan, Kashida, Kasuti, Kantha, Sozni, Shisha, Zardozi etc. are some of the commonly practiced Embroidery in Lehenga Style Saree.Bagh is a special kind of Embroidery done by women in Punjab to be worn during festivals and weddings. Bagh embroidery completely hides the base fabric and is a very heavy kind of embroidery. This Embroidery on Lehenga Style Saree is exquisite as often the cloth is barely visible and only the beautiful embroidery is visible. Kashida is a Kashmiri Embroidery type. This is very colorful and depicts Kashmir in its patterns. The other famous embroidery on Lehenga sarees are Kantha work and Kasuti work of Bangalore. Various rich and exquisite embellishments are used on Lehenga Style sarees patterns which include Silver embroidery, Golden embroidery, Metal beads, Real pearls, wood beads, glass beads, mirror work, lace work, Kundan, sequins, glittering stones, zardozi etc. Mostly rich fabrics like silk, georgette, brasso, brocade, chiffon, crepe etc are used in the making of a Lehenga style saree
































The method of draping this type of Saree is quite simple and easy. It's easier and tassle free than draping a regular saree. The plain end of the saree is tucked into the in skirt, making one complete round, similar to wearing a regular saree. At this point, pleats are formed in a regular saree whereas when it comes to a Lehenga Style Saree, one continues to tuck in without making any pleats. In a Lehenga Style Saree, pleats are replaced with embellished gotas or panels at the front, which imparts a flared silhouette that is characteristic of a Lehenga Style Saree. Finally, the pallu is draped over the shoulder like a regular saree.The only difference between a Lehenga style saree and a regular saree is that it doesn't require pleats to be formed at the front. Few Lehenga style saris come with side hooks too. Hook it and fix technique fits the Lehenga style saree snugly around the waist.The most common style is for the sari to be wrapped around the waist, with the loose end of the drape to be worn over the shoulder, baring the stomach.However, the sari can be draped in several different styles, though some styles do require a sari of a particular length or form. The French cultural anthropologist and sari researcher Chantal Boulanger categorized sari drapes in the following families.

Image result for gujarati style saree and lehenga photo

Image result for gujarati style saree and lehenga photo







 Nivi – styles originally worn in Andhra Pradesh; besides the modern nivi, there is also the kaccha nivi, where the pleats are passed through the legs and tucked into the waist at the back. This allows free movement while covering the legs.BENGALI and BIHARI style.










































Image result for gujarati style saree and lehenga photo

Image result for gujarati style saree and lehenga photo

Image result for gujarati style saree and lehenga photo

Image result for gujarati style saree and lehenga photo


Gujarati – this style differs from the nivi only in the manner that the loose end is handled: in this style, the loose end is draped over the right shoulder rather than the left, and is also draped back-to-front rather than the other way around. 





























   Maharashtrian/Konkani/Kashta; this drape is very similar to that of the male Maharashtrian dhoti. The center of the sari (held lengthwise) is placed at the center back, the ends are brought forward and tied securely, then the two ends are wrapped around the legs. When worn as a sari, an extra-long cloth is used and the ends are then passed up over the shoulders and the upper body. They are primarily worn by Brahmin women of Maharashtra, Karnataka, Andhra Pradesh and Goa. 



Dravidian – sari drapes worn in Tamil Nadu; many feature a pinkosu, or pleated rosette, at the waist.


Madisaara style – this drape is typical of Iyengar/Iyer Brahmin ladies from Karnataka, Tamil Nadu, and Kerala                                                                                                                                              

 Kodagu style – this drape is confined to ladies hailing from the Kodagu district of Karnataka. In this style, the pleats are created in the rear, instead of the front. The loose end of the sari is draped back-to-front over the right shoulder, and is pinned to the rest of the sari.                                                         


Gobbe Seere - This style is worn by women in the Malnad or Sahyadri and central region of Karnataka. It is worn with 18 molas saree with three four rounds at the waist and a knot after crisscrossing over shoulders.

























Gond – sari styles found in many parts of Central India. The cloth is first draped over the left shoulder, then arranged to cover the body.                                                                                                                                                                                   
Malayali style - the two-piece sari, or Mundum Neryathum, worn in Kerala. Usually made of unbleached cotton and decorated with gold or colored stripes and/or borders. Also the Set-saree, a sort of mundum neryathum.                            
 Tribal styles often secured by tying them firmly across the chest, covering the breasts.                                                                                                                                                         
The nivi style is today's most popular sari style.                                                                                                                                                                                                       
          









































A highly embroidered wedding sariThe nivi drape starts with one end of the sari tucked into the waistband of the petticoat, usually a plain skirt. The cloth is wrapped around the lower body once, then hand-gathered into even pleats just below the navel. The pleats are also tucked into the waistband of the petticoat.They create a graceful, decorative effect which poets have likened to the petals of a flower.






























After one more turn around the waist, the loose end is draped over the shoulder.The loose end is called the pallu or pallav or seragu or paita depending on the language. It is draped diagonally in front of the torso. It is worn across the right hip to over the left shoulder, partly baring the midriff.The navel can be revealed or concealed by the wearer by adjusting the pallu, depending on the social setting in which the sari is being worn. The long end of the pallu hanging from the back of the shoulder is often intricately decorated. The pallau may either be left hanging freely,tucked in at the waist, used to cover the head, or just used to cover the neck, by draping it across the right shoulder as well. Some nivi styles are worn with the pallu draped from the back towards the front,coming from the back over the right shoulder with one corner of the pallu tucked by the left hip, covering the torso/waist.

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