Thursday, 14 November 2013

#45 Fashion and design Traditional wedding

WHY DOES THE BRIDE THROW THE BOUQUET AT HER WEDDING -                               

Throughout Europe and North America, it is traditional for the bride to throw her bouquet at the reception and for all single women present to compete in catching it. The woman who catches the bouquet is said to be the next who will marry. But how did this custom originate? In medieval Europe, a bride typically did not expect to wear her wedding dress again, and the dress was considered good luck for other women, a type of fertility charm. After the wedding, single women chased the bride and ripped pieces off her dress, leaving her in tatters. Over the years, wedding dresses became more expensive and it became traditional for women to keep them, either as a memento or to pass on to a daughter for her wedding day.To prevent guests from ripping the wedding dress, brides began throwing other objects as a distraction, one of which was the garter. Later, the bouquet became the most traditionally thrown object. The wedding bouquet is particularly suited to this use, as flowers symbolize fertility, and as perishable items, they are not something the bride would wish to keep. The bouquet is also a safer item to toss than the garter, as unruly and impatient wedding guests were sometimes known to try to take the garter from the bride while she was still wearing it.




Some modern brides and grooms do not like the tradition of throwing the bouquet and either modify it or do away with it altogether. Tossing the bouquet can be uncomfortable for unmarried female guests who do not wish to marry or who feel put on the spot by the custom. Also, competition to catch the bouquet can become a violent stampede. Some brides stage the event so that their maid of honor or a friend who is engaged catches the bouquet. Others choose to give a small bouquet to each of their bridesmaids, or to give each woman at the reception a flower from the bridal bouquet.
Flowers are a wedding day essential but the most common question asked by our real brides is how to get a big impact with your wedding flowers, without spending a fortune. Throughout these pages you'll find hundreds of handy tips and inspirational pictures that will help you plan the right blooms for you, but here are a few tips to get you started…
Firstly, find out which flowers are in season. Import costs will be passed on to you so locally sourced blooms will be better value for money. Secondly, large headed blooms make a big statement without breaking the bank. Consider hydrangea, peonies and tea roses if you're after this kind of look. And finally the number one trick to saving money on your wedding flowers is to reuse them! Double up ceremony decorations as top table details and you're on your way to being a savvy, saving bride!
























For almost as long as there have been weddings, flowers have played an important role in the celebration. In selecting the flowers for your bridal bouquet, you’ll want to consider blooms that best express your personality, complement your wedding gown, and tie in with the general look and theme you’ve selected for the day. Here is a guide to the different styles of bouquets available, and how to get the perfect bridal flowers for your perfect day.                                                                                                        
Shapes and Styles                                                                                                     
When you see a bouquet that appeals to you, ask yourself what you like about it; is it the shape, size, color, style, or the way the stems are gathered with a beautiful satin ribbon? To help you select the bouquet that will blend seamlessly with the other elements of your wedding, here is a breakdown of traditional bouquet shapes and styles. 
Cascade: A cascade bouquet, also called a “shower” bouquet, is very formal and the most traditional bridal bouquet. Like a waterfall, this bouquet flows and is designed to gently cascade downward. This bouquet is often designed with larger flowers at the top, using smaller blooms as it begins to taper down and land gracefully over the bride’s hands. Lisianthus, lilies of the valley, stephanotis, dendrobium orchids, and other smaller flowers are commonly used in this shape of bouquet, along with accents of trailing ivy, vinca, or other delicate greenery. If you are wearing a full-skirted or ball gown-style wedding dress, this shape of bouquet may work for you. However, if you are a very petite woman, another shape of bouquet may be a better choice. 


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